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Naissance d’une famille

Please note that this event is now archived.
Documentary
Enfances à cœurParoles autochtones

Sessions

Friday, 13 April 2018 | 15:00 La Maison du Cinéma

                                    Poster of Naissance d’une famille

Prix du public – Edmonton International Film Festival 2017
Prix spécial du jury- ImagineNATIVE 2017
Sélection officielle – Hot Docs 2017
Sélection officielle – Cinefest Sudbury 2017

Three sisters and a brother, adopted as infants into separate families across North America, meet together for the first time in this deeply moving documentary by director Tasha Hubbard.

Removed from their young Dene mother’s care as part of Canada’s infamous Sixties Scoop, Betty Ann, Esther, Rosalie and Ben were four of the 20,000 Indigenous children taken from their families between 1955 and 1985, to be either adopted into white families or to live in foster care. As the four siblings piece together their shared history, their connection deepens, bringing laughter with it, and their family begins to take shape.

Director

Tasha Hubbard

Screenplay

Tasha Hubbard, Betty Ann Adam

Country

Canada

Year

2017

Duration

1h19

Category

Documentary

Language

English, subtitled in French

Production

Bonnie Thompson

Distribution

ONF - Office national du film du Canada
View the trailer Press kit
About

Tasha Hubbard

Tasha Hubbard (Cree) is an award-winning filmmaker and an Assistant Professor in the University of Saskatchewan’s Department of English. Her solo writing/directing project Two Worlds Colliding won a Gemini and a Golden Sheaf Award in 2005. Her animated short film Buffalo Calling screened as part of the Ga Ni Tha exhibit held on the occasion of the 2015 Venice Biennale, and her short hybrid documentary 7 Minutes won a Golden Sheaf Award in 2016.

Tasha also does research and creative projects on Indigenous media, the representation of the buffalo, and Indigenous women and children’s experiences. She speaks and writes widely on Indigenous media and racism both in Canada and abroad and is a blog contributor to the Broadbent Institute’s website.

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